Pembrokeshire Road Trip (Brewery)

A change of posting, rather than a full day post, I thought maybe a series of posts on a day to day of the road trip. Just check out the title for the post. Let me know what you think: a full day or a breakdown. I will still cover the day.

When it rains in Wales it rains and it didn’t stop all day. Still a lot to see, so lets get on with it.

Well worth the trip to a micro brewery is a little place called Gwaun Valley Brewery. The brewery was set up in 2009 by Len Davies, perfecting his recipes to get the unique flavours that everybody loves.

Brewery 1

Beer Shop

His wife Sarah designed the labels for the bottles and each shows a different scene from the Gwaun Valley.

Bottles

Beer Pull

On the B4313 five miles from Fishguard you will find the quaint brewery. With free tasting of the beers just to wet your appetite. Beers are for sale in individual bottles or a gift pack of three or you can buy has many bottles has you like. Great taste so worthwhile the visit. Staff are really polite and very helpful with no pressure sale.

Pembrokeshire Road Trip Day 4

Another day and further tales and information of our day.

Starting off at Porthgain I have been there before and wanted a return trip so I could pick up a few more pictures and to give you a run down on the quaint village. The village is steeped in history, was once a busy port transporting slate and building stone until the 1930’s. Today the harbour is used by fisherman and is a working fishing village.

Porthgain Map

Harbour PG

Climb up the steps and take the coastal pathway, the panoramic view is just stunning as is all the Pembrokeshire coast line.

PG View 1

Porthgain is a tourist spot and features eating, shopping and art galleries to tempt. The Sloop Inn in Porthgain pre dates from 1743. It’s one of the famous if not the most famous pubs in Pembrokeshire. The interior of the pub is quaint and historic, while the seating area around the front door is an ideal sun trap. The Sloop serve food at lunchtime and evenings. A specialty is fresh crab, which is landed daily at Porthgain harbour, only two hundred yards away.

Another favorite is The Shed serving up at lunchtimes and evenings serving teas, coffees, cakes, fish and chips and daily specials. The building was once the machine shop for the engines that operated the brick works in the industrial heyday of Porthgain. Although The Shed is a little expensive, the portions are substantial.

shed sign

Shed Building

Car parking at the village is a little hit and miss. It is free to park but with the number of tourist’s you have to wait until a spot becomes available.

Passing through Fishguard making towards a beach we past by the famous Fishguard Fort. The Napoleonic Fort at Fishguard was built between 1779 and 1781. It was armed with eight nine-pounder guns which were fired to warn off approaching French ships during the attempted French invasion of 1797.

Park up the car, take the short walk down to the fort.

FG Fort 1

Canon 1

If like me you do like a beach make your way past Fishguard and Newport. You will find a beach almost a mile. Traeth Mawr or Big Beach in the English translation. Excellent beach for the family, but follow the rules set out by the lifeguards, they are there for a reason. You can park on the beach when the tide is out, but there is a car park (fee paying). There is an attendant to take the parking fee. Toilets and a small shop is located at the site.

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Last port of call for the day was Strumble Head. Now if you want breathtaking, then this is the place for you. Road leading to the head is a little narrow at times, so take your time through the winding road. But the trip is worthwhile. The rocky coast line and the lighthouse is amazing.

St Head coast line 1

Lighthouse 1

Another fabulous day of traveling.

 

 

Pembrokeshire Road Trip Day 3

What will today bring on? Well to kick off, Bacon and Egg sandwich cooked by my wife. Then off to our first point of call.

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Abereiddi, with it’s main attraction of the Blue Lagoon. Check the link for more information on both beach and lagoon. The car park is free and “Yes” the ice cream van is there. A short walk takes you to the Blue Lagoon and you are not disappointed. While we were there a few people were jumping into the lagoon.

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On the way down the coastal path I turned and caught the shot featuring the round building through the mountains,

Round Building 1

Well worth the visit, also you can book the new fad of Coasteering. There is a van on the site and will take bookings for a course of climbing on the cliffs.

Moving on around the coast towards Whitesand Beach for our picnic lunch. On our arrival the car park fee is 5GBP which is a little expensive, we would be staying for a short time. So we moved on to another location. There is a cafe and toilet facilitates at the location and the beach looked fabulous.

Looking for another place we traveled through St David’s and onto Port Clais. A lovely place to visit. Be careful of the tides as they move in fast, there is a story to why I have mentioned this, but will not go into to much detail as my better half would not be happy.

Car park costs 2GBP and there is a nice little cafe selling the usual fare. Try the ice cream, just yummy.

Porthclais

Port Clais sign

(also known as Porth Clais) harbour was built in the 12th century and served nearby St. Davids, importing coal and timber. The entire harbour is within the St. David’s Peninsula Site of Special Scientific Interest. Porthclais is still used as a small port by local fishermen and recreational sailors. The old harbour wall, built by the Romans is largely intact. The harbour dries out at low tide and is a good launching spot for small boats, dive craft and kayaks who are setting out to explore St Bride’s Bay.

Port Clais Harbour 1

On the way back to the car, walking the coast pathway.

Coast Path sign

looking down the gorge at the beauty of the harbour I captured a shot of the boats.

Gorge Boats

Back to the house and looking forward to more adventures.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pembrokeshire Road Trip Day 2

Weather is overcast, but still a quick breakfast, shower and off we go. Emily and Andre have joined us. First stop St David’s Cathedral.

Check out the following link for more information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_David%27s_Cathedral

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Davids Bishops Palace (also sometimes denoted as Bishop’s Palace or Bishops’ Palace) (Welsh: Llys yr Esgob Tyddewi) is a ruined medieval palace located adjacent to St Davids Cathedral in the city of St Davids and well worth visiting.  You can’t miss the ruins. There is an entrance fee of 4GBP for Adults. The fee allows you inside and to wonder around the palace.

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Moving on after a look round St David’s city and tasting one of the famous Oggie meat pie we go onto the Newgale beach. Climbing the stone break to the sandy beach.

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All pictures straight out of the camera. No editing

 

Pineapple Seller’s In Angkor Wat

On our visit to Angkor Wat to take pictures of the beautiful temple and I managed to take a few. My other focus was on capturing the street vendors selling their products to make a little money to feed their families. Walking back to the car I saw these two ladies selling pineapple. I took three pictures of them, one with the focus on the lady at the back and the last one I featured the first lady. Her eyes make the pictures and she is stareing away from the camera.

 

Selling Pineapple (1 of 1) Selling Pineapple 2 (1 of 1)

Selling Pineapple 3 (1 of 1)

 

Yangon Collection (Railway Trip) Pt 1

A three hour trip on the circular railway is a great way to take in the outskirts of Yangon. Highly recommended if you have a stop over. Seating is 3rd class, but no matter vendors walk up and down the carriages selling anything from drinks to fruit. The vendors hop on and off at each station, so you are sure to see different items to buy.

Traveling to Myanmar? Take a look at this guide, written by Len Rutledge. Who is one of Australia’s most respected travel writers. His articles and books have appeared worldwide and his background and experience in the travel and tourism industry is unsurpassed. Luxury travel, budget travel, adventure travel, individual and group travel he has done it all.

Experience Myanmar (Burma) (Experience Guides)

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Hoi An , Vietnam

Arrived in Hoi An late on Friday 11th April. We are staying at The Thanh Binh Riverside. It is a great location to the old town within walking distance. Relative new hotel, the staff are very helpful and willing to please.
A must is the local beer brewed in the town at 5000 VD (23 cents) a glass, looks like this will be the tipple of the day or everyday.

Beer 23 Cents

Beer 23 Cents

I have visited the location before but decided to return to see what changes there may have been after a three years gap. The town still retains it’s uniqueness, with it’s charming old town. The walk through the buildings is photographers paradise. There is opportunity to capture imagines everywhere.

Hoi An

Hoi An

Below is a short history taken from “Wikipedia” about the town.
Hội An also Faifoo, is a city of Vietnam, on the coast of the East Sea in the South Central Coast region of Vietnam. It is located in Quảng Nam Province and is home to approximately 120,000 inhabitants. It is recognized as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Hội An Ancient Town is an exceptionally well-preserved example of a South-East Asian trading port dating from the 15th to the 19th century. Its buildings and its street plan reflect the influences, both indigenous and foreign, that have combined to produce this unique heritage site.

The city possessed the largest harbour in Southeast Asia in the 1st century and was known as Lâm Ấp Phố (Champa City). Between the seventh and 10th centuries, the Cham (people of Champa) controlled the strategic spice trade and with this came tremendous wealth. The former harbour town of the Cham at the estuary of the Thu Bồn River was an important Vietnamese trading centre in the 16th and 17th centuries, where Chinese from various provinces as well as Japanese, Dutch and Indians settled. During this period of the China trade, the town was called Hai Pho (Seaside Town) in Vietnamese. Originally, Hai Pho was a divided town with the Japanese settlement across the “Japanese Bridge” (16th-17th century). The bridge (Chùa cầu) is a unique covered structure built by the Japanese.

Japanese Bridge

Japanese Bridge

Dining here is good with a variety of cuisines, vietnamese, Italian and other international fare. Good Morning Vietnam is a must dining venture. Italian cuisine at reasonable prices. Try their limoncello it is the best ever.

Walking With Their Goods For Sale

Walking With Their Goods For Sale

Selling From The Bike

Selling From The Bike

Walking Away

Walking Away

Hat

Hat

Old Lady Smoking

Old Lady Smoking


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