Pembrokeshire Road Trip (Cheese)

Carrying on after the brewery why not pop into a place to buy a load of cheese? We visited the same shop about three years ago and nothing has changed.

Pant Mawr Farmhouse Cheeses. The guy I remembered is still three, with is Welsh charm and taking the time to talk about his cheese. Sampling the best quality cheese I have tasted anywhere in the world.

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Talk about family business, well this is it. Dad, Mom and son in the shop.

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Known has the Cheese Shed. Doubles up has a Post Office. We brought six of their seven cheeses for under 20 GBP. From November to Christmas they offer a 10% discount on their cheeses. So a big saving for your Christmas hamper.

Say Cheese

 

Pembrokeshire Road Trip (Brewery)

A change of posting, rather than a full day post, I thought maybe a series of posts on a day to day of the road trip. Just check out the title for the post. Let me know what you think: a full day or a breakdown. I will still cover the day.

When it rains in Wales it rains and it didn’t stop all day. Still a lot to see, so lets get on with it.

Well worth the trip to a micro brewery is a little place called Gwaun Valley Brewery. The brewery was set up in 2009 by Len Davies, perfecting his recipes to get the unique flavours that everybody loves.

Brewery 1

Beer Shop

His wife Sarah designed the labels for the bottles and each shows a different scene from the Gwaun Valley.

Bottles

Beer Pull

On the B4313 five miles from Fishguard you will find the quaint brewery. With free tasting of the beers just to wet your appetite. Beers are for sale in individual bottles or a gift pack of three or you can buy has many bottles has you like. Great taste so worthwhile the visit. Staff are really polite and very helpful with no pressure sale.

Pembrokeshire Road Trip Day 4

Another day and further tales and information of our day.

Starting off at Porthgain I have been there before and wanted a return trip so I could pick up a few more pictures and to give you a run down on the quaint village. The village is steeped in history, was once a busy port transporting slate and building stone until the 1930’s. Today the harbour is used by fisherman and is a working fishing village.

Porthgain Map

Harbour PG

Climb up the steps and take the coastal pathway, the panoramic view is just stunning as is all the Pembrokeshire coast line.

PG View 1

Porthgain is a tourist spot and features eating, shopping and art galleries to tempt. The Sloop Inn in Porthgain pre dates from 1743. It’s one of the famous if not the most famous pubs in Pembrokeshire. The interior of the pub is quaint and historic, while the seating area around the front door is an ideal sun trap. The Sloop serve food at lunchtime and evenings. A specialty is fresh crab, which is landed daily at Porthgain harbour, only two hundred yards away.

Another favorite is The Shed serving up at lunchtimes and evenings serving teas, coffees, cakes, fish and chips and daily specials. The building was once the machine shop for the engines that operated the brick works in the industrial heyday of Porthgain. Although The Shed is a little expensive, the portions are substantial.

shed sign

Shed Building

Car parking at the village is a little hit and miss. It is free to park but with the number of tourist’s you have to wait until a spot becomes available.

Passing through Fishguard making towards a beach we past by the famous Fishguard Fort. The Napoleonic Fort at Fishguard was built between 1779 and 1781. It was armed with eight nine-pounder guns which were fired to warn off approaching French ships during the attempted French invasion of 1797.

Park up the car, take the short walk down to the fort.

FG Fort 1

Canon 1

If like me you do like a beach make your way past Fishguard and Newport. You will find a beach almost a mile. Traeth Mawr or Big Beach in the English translation. Excellent beach for the family, but follow the rules set out by the lifeguards, they are there for a reason. You can park on the beach when the tide is out, but there is a car park (fee paying). There is an attendant to take the parking fee. Toilets and a small shop is located at the site.

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Last port of call for the day was Strumble Head. Now if you want breathtaking, then this is the place for you. Road leading to the head is a little narrow at times, so take your time through the winding road. But the trip is worthwhile. The rocky coast line and the lighthouse is amazing.

St Head coast line 1

Lighthouse 1

Another fabulous day of traveling.

 

 

Pembrokeshire Road Trip Day 3

What will today bring on? Well to kick off, Bacon and Egg sandwich cooked by my wife. Then off to our first point of call.

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Abereiddi, with it’s main attraction of the Blue Lagoon. Check the link for more information on both beach and lagoon. The car park is free and “Yes” the ice cream van is there. A short walk takes you to the Blue Lagoon and you are not disappointed. While we were there a few people were jumping into the lagoon.

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On the way down the coastal path I turned and caught the shot featuring the round building through the mountains,

Round Building 1

Well worth the visit, also you can book the new fad of Coasteering. There is a van on the site and will take bookings for a course of climbing on the cliffs.

Moving on around the coast towards Whitesand Beach for our picnic lunch. On our arrival the car park fee is 5GBP which is a little expensive, we would be staying for a short time. So we moved on to another location. There is a cafe and toilet facilitates at the location and the beach looked fabulous.

Looking for another place we traveled through St David’s and onto Port Clais. A lovely place to visit. Be careful of the tides as they move in fast, there is a story to why I have mentioned this, but will not go into to much detail as my better half would not be happy.

Car park costs 2GBP and there is a nice little cafe selling the usual fare. Try the ice cream, just yummy.

Porthclais

Port Clais sign

(also known as Porth Clais) harbour was built in the 12th century and served nearby St. Davids, importing coal and timber. The entire harbour is within the St. David’s Peninsula Site of Special Scientific Interest. Porthclais is still used as a small port by local fishermen and recreational sailors. The old harbour wall, built by the Romans is largely intact. The harbour dries out at low tide and is a good launching spot for small boats, dive craft and kayaks who are setting out to explore St Bride’s Bay.

Port Clais Harbour 1

On the way back to the car, walking the coast pathway.

Coast Path sign

looking down the gorge at the beauty of the harbour I captured a shot of the boats.

Gorge Boats

Back to the house and looking forward to more adventures.